Day One or One Day?

This one is quick and straight to the point.

I don’t even know where to begin. What the $*&% is going on? Is this really happening?

Recent events and commentary about Charlottesville has us all thinking and contemplating our next move. Well, apparently people are “making America great again.” Really? #smdh

Well if anyone cares, America was great before all this “ish” started going down – like about a year or so ago—now enters the current president. A couple of things come to mind when I think about all that has transpired over the last couple of months and possible next moves:

  1. Since we were bamboozled last November, perhaps we should think about another voting system: maybe a fingerprint– the middle finger sounds about right.
  2. We need to continue to teach children to understand and accept differences early on. But they also need to understand race and racism. There’s a difference.
  3. Do your own research when it comes to politics, controversy, and whatever else. And then pass truth on because everyone loves false truths.
  4. The media is tricky – watch what you watch and hear – everything is up for discussion these days but it may not be what it’s cracked up to be.
  5. Stop living up to stereotypes that you or others have created. Do the opposite of what the “label” reads.
  6. Continue to pull people’s card when they say or do something that makes you uncomfortable. And I don’t only mean from a black and white standpoint – but all standpoints.
  7. No need to talk in code. Tell what’s really going on even if you offend people.
  8. Continue to hold politicians accountable. Write a letter, send an email, or just show up.
  9. Do the right thing- always. No need to be right. Just do right. Simple.
  10. And finally, work on getting 45 out of the White House. No other explanation needed.

This is a reminder that we all have to move more towards what needs to be done–purposefully and strategically–as opposed to waiting for someone else to do it. Present company included.

You either start with day one OR one day. You decide.

Because the sun always comes out after the rain . . .

Sun Taylor

Advertisements

Our First . . . MLRO

Beauty. Style. Grace. Michelle Obama. Need I say more.

She was the first and will probably be the last of what the First Lady should truly encompass as the woman who stands not behind, nor in front, but beside a great man. Never perturbed by what others thought she “should” look or act like, and for that matter, what her kids should act like, she belonged to herself, being herself.

And that’s exactly what made this nation so proud to call her FLOTUS. From her candor as, first and foremost, “mom-in-chief” to being married to our president, who ain’t bad either,  we fell in love with her – quickly and deeply.

She was like our aunt, sister, or friend stepping out on stage in 2008 and 2012; an instant connection because of her humility – and she was headed to the White House. The same house, built by slaves, which she unequivocally brought to our attention during her speech at the DNC, speaking her truth. Yes ma’am this was our First Lady, my First Lady.

There were so many firsts but the first that will forever go down in history; she was our first black First Lady. Just stop right there and take it in. FIRST.

In my excitement as we came to know her, I wrote an ode about Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama when her husband was the Democratic presidential candidate. I rummaged through my 44th presidential paraphernalia this week and found it. Ding, ding, ding, ding, ding!

While I would never bore you with the entire poem, here are a couple stanzas (I know a little something about poetry) that speak to how proud I am to have called her the First Lady.

_________

You, a black woman, strong, courageous, elegant, determined
led the way like so many other black women – Harriet, Ida, and Madame C.J.

You, a black woman, like me, married an educated and dedicated man
who values family & fellowship and are true to their word as men

You, a black woman, with two beautiful black children, whom you hold
near and dear to your heart and cherish with your touch, defines the meaning of family

You a black woman, gave your husband a front-fist pound (on national TV )
which spoke pride to all black men, women, and children

You, a black woman, wore a White House Black Market dress
and will soon occupy the White House, the most prominent address in our nation

You, a black woman, often imitated, but never duplicated
will be the First Lady of this country

You, Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama
I thank you for being a black woman

_________

I can’t begin to tell you how much she has influenced me and so many other women I imagine. It’s tough seeing her leave the White House, that great man we called our president, and those two girls who have become women before our very own eyes. And let’s not forget momma Robinson who came along too :o).

We all should be thankful we experienced this in our lifetime. As Dr. Seuss says
“Don’t cry because it’s over, smile because it happened.”

Because the sun always comes out after the rain. . .

Sun Taylor

Ode to the Obamas 

It’s Tuesday, November 4, 2008 and I have just stepped in to history- literally.

My husband and I (uhh pre-kids :o) are at Mrs. Juanita Abernathy’s house – yes, Rev. Ralph David Abernathy’s widow – as in the civil rights leader and Dr. King’s closest friend. Wait. . . WHAT?!?!

We were invited to her house through our dear aunt for an election night watch party. I remember my husband whispering, “are we using the same silverware as Dr. King?” Like kids in a candy story, grins galore. Imagine that.

The night proceeds and Obama wins. Everyone is in utter shock, but fortunately not the same shock we just experienced. Mrs. Abernathy jumps up in excitement and then the tears start to fall.

I will never forget this. I do believe she was thankful all her hard work along with her husband and Dr. King had come to fruition. We had a Black president.

Fast forward into eight years. The lessons from this resilient Illinois senator named Barack Hussein Obama, with his outstanding lawyer wife, Michelle, and their beautiful children began that night in 2008.

As they walked on stage,  I remember feeling overwhelmed. Be proud of what your ancestors did no matter what. You are standing on their shoulders and can be anything, even the president of the United States. 

And then in 2009, I fully saw the First Lady and what she was capable of as she strut down Pennsylvania Avenue Inauguration Day. Regal. Be thankful for the skin you are in – you have reached new heights as a woman, a Black woman.

Now second term in 2012, it’s the day Obama gave a speech after the Newton shooting in Connecticut. I saw a parent grieving for his own children.  Tomorrow is not promised so be thankful for today and love on your children everyday. 

Obama at the various White House Correspondent Dinners was the epitome of a “real” president with his humor and prose. Never take yourself too seriously and learn from what others think of you, but stay true to yourself. 

And let’s not forget about the fashion. The First Lady is hands down the best ever and never afraid to go for it. Women should always embrace their various shapes and sizes because we can all wear it well from our hips to lips. 

Last but not least, the ultimate came when the First Lady spoke about the White House and slavery at the Democratic National Convention. We must always remember where we came from in order to move forward and never be afraid to speak truth.

The Obamas will always remain a staple in our history and I am forever changed for the better. Who knows what the future holds but I am always reminded “when they go low, we go high.”

Because the sun always comes out after the rain . . .

Sun Taylor

 (Photo: Essence Magazine)